Inappropriate Communication

Inappropriate CommunicationGiven the title of this article, let’s first be clear about what we are writing about.  We do not speak here of communicating inappropriate things, rather we are talking about using a form of communication which is inappropriate for its purpose.  Once upon a time and not that long ago, there were two primary forms of communication.  You could either talk with someone face-to-face, or you could write them a letter if they were far away.  It is pretty easy to assess nonverbal cues and emotions when you are speaking with someone face-to-face, but it is more difficult when you are writing.  Perhaps that is why that letters were pages long back in the day, because people wanted to make sure their meaning was completely communicated.  There was typically no inappropriate communication, you either spoke to someone or wrote them.  One form was not substituted when the other was appropriate.  When the telegraph came along in 1844, it dramatically sped up long distance communication, but due to its expense, was not a substitute for a letter.

 

Perhaps the first electronic device that allowed for inappropriate communication was the telephone.  Invented in 1876, there were literally millions of American homes that had a telephone by 1910.  With the telephone, you could deliver unpleasant news in a way that allowed you from having to actually see that individual, while simultaneously making it easier to terminate the conversation at a time of your choosing.  The addition of voicemail made accomplishing that task easier yet.  In the past 30 years, numerous additional forms of communication have been added to our arsenal.  Email came first, and by making phones smart we made them ubiquitous.  Throw in videoconferencing and social media and you have a virtual communications cornucopia!

 

Why is it now that we have more ways to communicate than ever, communication has become more difficult than ever?  There is certainly no shortage of communication going on, go to any restaurant and observe families gathered around a table where all of them have their heads buried in their phones.  I have heard people say that their millennial offspring only communicate on Facebook or text, that it is pointless to send them an email or try to call them.  I even know one individual who is completely paralyzed, with no use of his hands.  Yet people who know he is paralyzed still send him texts!  Perhaps what is needed is a communications primer.

 

Such a primer would start by distinguishing between when to use verbal and when to use written communication.  Verbal communication is typically best used when you need to convey context associated with a message.  Verbal communication allows you to use elements of nonverbal communication, tone and intonation in order to strengthen elements of your message in a way that written communication cannot.  Additionally, verbal communication is the only method to use when you need immediate feedback from the person to whom a message is being sent.  Never substitute a text or an email when what is needed is a conversation.

 

Written communication is best used when a one-way delivery of facts is required.  The beauty of written communication is that it does not take as much time on the part of the receiving party to get the message , and you have a record of what was communicated.  Our time is the most precious commodity we all have, so using in person communication when written is appropriate can be a waste of everyone’s time.  Written communication is also the most appropriate form to use when you are sending a lot of detail, such as a proposal or technical document.  The most difficult thing to communicate in a written document is context.  People may take your message in a completely different light than the way you intended it.  Perhaps that is the reason for the rise in the use of emoticons, although they may not be appropriate in a business setting.

 

There is obviously no one correct way of communicating with someone, but as a society we seemed to have lost some awareness of what may be appropriate in different situations.  The correct method of communication depends completely on the situation calling for its use in the first place.  Perhaps the best way to choose the appropriate form of communication is to put yourself in the shoes of the one to whom the communication is intended.  A major part of being an effective communicator is the use of good judgment regarding the type of communication utilized.


That Floating Price Point

Chances are if you are a medium to larger size business, you have defined what type of organization you strive to be and what that means relative to pricing your products in the market.  For example, you may strive to be a leading-edge provider of the best products and solutions, and your pricing is targeted to yield a specific return, regardless of the competition.  On the other hand, you may have decided that all products are essentially commodities, and you strive to be the low price leader to the point of your target margin.  If however you are like many thousands of small businesses, you have never formally defined what type of organization you want to be, nor have you determined any type of pricing strategy for your business.  You simply bid each job as it comes, using some type of pricing mechanism that you believe will yield a profit.  This column is aimed at this last group, because there are a few proven things you can do to improve the profitability of your business relative to pricing, and it doesn’t take a Harvard MBA to implement them.

1. Define Your Overall Business Strategy.

This doesn’t have to be complicated, but it sets the tone for everything else you do.  For example, you may have gone into business for yourself because you thought you could do it better than how you have seen it done, and you thought in the long run you could make more money.  You would like to someday sell your business, and have it be attractive enough that someone would want to buy it.  Other than that, you just want to be competitive and make a good profit.  So, define what is a “good profit.”  Is that 1%, 5%, 10%?  You have to answer this question.  Consider that someday when you sell your business, someone will want to know what kind of profits it generates, whereby they might be willing to pay 5-7 times earnings for that business.  If your business is only generating 1% or 2% net profit, you may end up having to sell it strictly for the assets.  It’s a good idea to talk with others in your industry before committing your answer to paper, do not shortcut this step.

2. Understand Prevailing Prices in Your Market

Who are your main competitors?  What do their prices look like relative to yours?  It is important to understand the market in which you operate relative to your overall business strategy.  If you are like the business described above and you are in a medium-sized or larger market, figure out which competitors are most similar to yours in terms of your business strategy and understand where they price their jobs.  Perhaps you plan to offer a good-better-best product strategy, so make sure you are comparing apples for apples when you look at prevailing pricing in the market.

3. Determine Your Target Market

Do you want to do jobs anywhere, or is there a specific area you want to concentrate your efforts in?  Chances are, you intrinsically know the answer to this, so define it in terms of specific ZIP Codes, and areas within those ZIP Codes.  You can base this on the age of the housing stock along with a variety of other demographics easily available.  (I.e. age of homeowners, household income etc.) Focusing your efforts on the customers most likely to fit your overall business strategy enhances your ability to be successful.  This is also an essential step toward developing a targeted marketing campaign.

4. Develop A Pricing Strategy That Fits with Your Overall Objectives

Perhaps you have decided that you essentially want to have an “everyday price” strategy as defined by margin goals by class of product.  You are willing to negotiate within reason, but you want to spend the limited amount of labor hours you have on jobs that yield your target margins.  Given that, you might plan to run occasional promotions, essentially one time deals to entice customers at certain times of the year or to throw off your competitors.  If you have a good-better-best product offering, you could price it in such a way that higher-end products or solutions deliver commensurately higher margins.  On the other hand, you could “sandwich” your pricing in such a way as to drive the consumer toward the solution in the middle category.  The point is, there are a number of ways to accomplish the same objective.

5. Do Job Costing

It is imperative to know how much you made on each job relative to your objective, and why.  This allows you to make the necessary corrections in order to make sure you are achieving your ultimate objective.  There are many places you can go to get help putting in systems to accomplish all this, and they don’t have to be complicated.  They just require a commitment on your part to make it happen!

 

Images courtesy of egyptinnovate.com & aviationbusinessconsultant.com


Did You Fail the Interview?

Did you fail the interview?

Image courtesy of wiki how

Remember, you are not the only one who is conducting the interview. According to LinkedIn Business Solutions, 65% of candidates say a bad interview experience make them lose interest in the job.

Interviewing is one of those subjects that everyone has an opinion about, because anyone who has ever worked (which includes just about everyone) has been through one.  Most of us have been through more than one interview in our lives, which likely means we have experienced both good and bad interviews.  This refers to the quality of the interview, not to our performance in them.  Unfortunately, it seems like attention paid to the interviewing process is lacking by many of those conducting them.  For one, the interviewing process is all too often handled in too casual of a manner, and is not approached from a planned or analytical point of view.  For example, if the person conducting an interview is the one who happens to be available at that moment in time, consider your firm guilty of failing the interview!  Other cardinal sins of interviewing include the interviewer talking too much, winging it when it comes to asking questions, not writing down and keeping a record of the candidate’s responses and not being clear it when it comes to articulating next steps with the candidate.  So what should you be trying to accomplish in interview and what are some steps you should take to make sure that is accomplished?

The objective of the interview should be formally defined by the interviewer in advance, and stated to the interviewee at the beginning of the discussion.  For example, you might tell the interviewee that the objective of the interview today is to better ascertain the candidates skills and fit for the opening available, and to allow the interviewee to find out more about both the company and the position so they can better decide whether it is a good fit for them.  If this is only an initial interview, make sure that is clear at the outset.  All persons from the company who plan on interviewing the same candidate should briefly meet before hand to discuss their strategy.  There is nothing to be gained by having multiple people ask the candidate the same or similar questions.  For example, one person might drill down on the candidates education and experience, while another might probe how they have or would handle real or theoretical situations.  The point is to find out information that you cannot discern from looking at their resume.  Following that, the interviewer should keep the following in mind as the discussion progresses.

  1. Allow sufficient time for the interview. If you rush the interview because you have too many other things going on, that will send major negative vibes to the candidate.  Remember, you are not only taking time out of your day for this process, but also time that the candidate could be productively looking for a job elsewhere.  If you are not prepared to spend a sufficient amount of time on the interview, reschedule or don’t hold the interview at all.
  2. Your job is to learn more about the candidate, not to tell them all about the position and how great the company is. Generally speaking, the interviewer should talk 20% of the time and listen 80% of the time.
  3. Give serious thought to your questions before hand and have them written down. You should be asking open ended questions that will elicit conversation, not those that lend themselves to yes/no or pat answers.  Having the questions written down keeps you from straying too far off course, and it communicates that you take both the candidate and the process seriously.  On the other hand, you want to be flexible enough to pursue a line of questioning if it is merited.  If you ask a question that elicits concern or further questions in your mind, spend time following your concern until you are satisfied. Jot notes down regarding the candidates responses to them, because a week later you are not likely to remember key elements of the candidates answers.  In addition, these notes will be extremely important if they are needed for reference prior to/during a subsequent interview.
  4. Remember that you communicate not only with what you say, but with how you say it. Your inflection, eye contact and body language are sending messages to the candidate.  By the same token, be looking for both verbal and nonverbal clues from the candidate in terms of their reaction to certain questions or elements of the discussion.
  5. Following the interview, all persons from the company who spoke with the candidate should briefly get together to compare notes. If you are the hiring manager, you may hear something from one of the other interviewers that causes you to disqualify the candidate, even if you had not arrived at that conclusion from your particular line of questioning.

 

While much, much more could be (and has been) written about this topic, these tips can go a long way toward making your interviews significantly more productive – both for you and for the candidate.


Are You a Micromanager?

Are you a micromanager?

Image courtesy of Pinterest

The term micromanager is one that is perceived negatively by managers – as it should be!  The behaviors associated with being a micromanager include detailed inquiries into the activities of both the employee and projects they are engaged in.  Micromanagers not only want to control the outcome of their employees projects, they also want to direct the process of how those outcomes are achieved.  These managers feel it is their job to give detailed directions to their employee in order to maintain control of the project.  If you were to ask the manager how they felt about the way they interacted with their employees, they might admit to wanting to maintain control, but it is doubtful they would classify themselves as micromanagers.

 

Their employees however would offer a different perspective.  They would likely describe themselves as frustrated and their work environment as constrained.  Micromanagement can reduce an employee’s productivity because it inhibits their creativity and erodes their confidence in solving problems.  Over time, this can cause the relationship between the employee and their manager to become strained and can result in low morale and high turnover.  Micromanagement typically drives away the good people, leaving in place the less capable.

 

Why does a manager micromanage?  Typically, these managers fear losing control, and the only way they know how to maintain it is to involve themselves in every aspect of their employees activity.  They might fear losing control because they are a new manager, and don’t know how else to practice their managerial duties. An all too often scenario is that an individual who is highly skilled and has a great deal of expertise is promoted into management.  Now they find themselves in a situation where they have responsibility over individuals they see as being much less skilled, so they feel the need to exert control in order to achieve outcomes that look like the ones they have produced in the past.  Perhaps you are an entrepreneur who went into business for yourself in order to be your own boss.  Now your business has grown, and you have people working for you who have high levels of competence.  This might make you feel diminished or out of control, so you react by involving yourself deeper into the daily activities of your employees.  This likely will result in outcomes you don’t expect and don’t want.

 

Employees who are being micromanaged will likely react one of two ways.  On the one hand, they may develop a total dependence on the manager because they don’t feel like they can make a decision on their own.  That reduces productivity because employees feel that the best way to accomplish what the boss is asking for is to run everything by them before taking action on anything.  If the boss is busy, which is typically the case, waiting on decisions extends the timeline of the project.  It may also lead the employee to stop caring, which causes their talent to be underutilized because it is no longer offered.  On the other hand, employees who pride themselves on their own capabilities and expertise will feel building frustration and resentment toward the manager.  This resentment can lead toward conflict with the manager, and the resulting frustration can cause the employee to leave the organization.  If the employee was truly talented, their loss should be chalked up to poor management.  The best thing an employee can do with a micromanaging supervisor is to give them all the information they need.  Knowing their boss thrives on details, they should provide them with detailed reports.  They should also ask clarifying questions in order to make sure they know what their bosses are looking for, and repeat the answers they are given to make sure they have heard correctly.  For managers, the most important realization they can come to is that micromanagement does not offer any benefit as far as workplace productivity and employee development are concerned.  Managers need to be clear about what needs to be accomplished and by when, then give general directions as far as how the end result should be accomplished.  They should make it clear to their employees that if they want direction they should not be afraid to ask for it.  If the employee then does ask for guidance, they should not be berated for doing so.  By letting your employees make decisions about how they accomplish outcomes related to their responsibilities, you will be helping them learn how to become managers in their own right while freeing yourself for higher-level activities.


A Crisis of Trust

Source: supportforstepdads.com

The Annual Edelman Trust Barometer shows an overall reduction of trust in the four institutions it measures; the government, media, business and nongovernmental institutions.  In addition, the credibility of  “a person like yourself” – often a source of news and information on social media, has dipped to an all-time low in the studies history.  The survey shows trust falling more steeply in the United States than in any of the 28 countries surveyed, despite the robust economy and booming stock market.  The survey also showed that Americans’ trust in their own companies fell more steeply than in any other country.  Richard Edelman, head of the communications marketing firm that commissioned the research, said “The United States is enduring an unprecedented crisis of trust.”  Why is that, and could it be happening in your business?

 

The survey sites a number of reasons for this discord.  The past year has been one of exceptional public opinion volatility, and concerns about issues ranging from stagnant wage growth to mass shootings along with a number of others are juxtaposed against the buoyancy of a strong economy.  According to the survey, the result is an unsettled and unnerved public at large.  Particularly for business leaders, the survey suggests that this is not the time for inaction or staying silent.  Getting employees and customers to trust you can be complicated, but it is imperative to your success.  If lost, it may be impossible to recover.

 

According to Chelsea Berler of the Entrepreneurial Network, the following seven concrete actions build trust in a business environment.

  1. Demonstrate That You Trust Others. One way to do this is to be generous and forgiving when someone else makes a mistake or disappoints you in some way.
  2. Create Relationships That Are Mutually Beneficial. Customers and employees all want to believe they are making the right decision to work with you, and trust is about showing people you care about them.
  3. Directly Address Issues. How you deal with concerns and problems is what instills trust and loyalty.
  4. Tell the Truth. If you get caught in a lie, no one will trust you.
  5. Be Flexible and Patient. Trust is built over time, especially when you are dealing with someone who isn’t fortunate enough to have experienced trust in their own life.
  6. Respect Others Time. To earn others trust, raise your awareness of their time, personal schedule and needs.
  7. Deliver the Unexpected. The best way to deliver trust is to delight clients and customers.

 

Click Here, For more information on this topic from this article.

 

Sources: The Edelman Trust Barometer; Chelsea Berler, Entrepreneurial Network


The Amazon Effect

Howard Schultz, Starbucks’ longtime CEO and current Chairman, says the retail industry is facing critical challenges.  “For every consumer brand that exists today, especially a brick-and-mortar retailer like Starbucks, there are very unique challenges because there is such a seismic change in consumer behavior – the Amazon effect,” he said.  That’s not really news, anyone who has been paying attention knows that Amazon is reshaping the retail landscape.  But beyond vague awareness, what are the numbers?  What is really happening?

 

Amazon started with books, then went to selling virtually… Everything.  Sales of electronics and general merchandise have have increased in the range of 2-3% year-over-year since 2007, while e-commerce sales of these items have increased in the range of 14-17% during this time.  That means more and more sales in this category are happening online than in a brick and mortar store.  Sales at Amazon however in this category have increased 28-74% year-over-year during this timeframe, which means an increasing number of these online sales are happening through Amazon.  According to a 2017 Forbes article, “Amazon’s entry into a market segment reshapes shopping dynamics, upsets the supply chain and exerts tremendous pricing and margin pressure.  Store closings are followed by bankruptcies and once proud and dominant retailers are teetering on the brink.”  Amazon now accounts for approximately 43% of all e-commerce sales.  Can this go on forever?  Maybe, and while the Amazon Effect may be good for consumers today, there may be a reckoning in the long-term.  According to Forbes, Amazon isn’t required by its investors to make any real money.  Amazon shareholders provide huge subsidies to its delivery operation, and according to one analysis, Amazon lost $7.2 billion on shipping costs last year alone.  That’s billion, with a B.

 

Source: Marketingsherpa

Source: Marketingsherpa

 

What does that mean for the HVAC industry?  Certainly, the industry is not immune from this phenomena.  A recent ACHR article cited research by an HVAC manufacturer that showed 43 websites selling HVAC equipment direct to consumers, and these websites collected more than 40 million hits.  The article points out that as ominous as these figures might seem, the closing rate for these Internet resellers was only around 3%.  That suggests that consumers were using these websites more for education than for purchasing.  Part of their education however includes obtaining better information about the price of equipment.  That has implications for every contractor, because today’s consumers want to know what things are going to cost before they buy.  They (read millennial’s) are much less likely to be okay with time and material estimates or convoluted explanations of what things cost.

 

When big-box retailers first came on the scene, there were predictions of the demise of traditional contractors that didn’t come true.  Do not confuse the Internet phenomena however with the advent of big-box retailers.  Internet information and sales are here to stay.  The above-mentioned news article asks contractors what they will do if they are approached by consumers asking them to install equipment purchased online.  Predictably, many contractors will stiffen their back and say they will never bow to such transactions.  The question is however, is that the smart move?  When your labor is fully productive and you have more sales than you can handle, perhaps that is the smart move.  But that is not always the case, is it?  Does it make sense to ignore ways of productively engaging your labor when you are otherwise keeping people employed by having them clean the shop or the trucks?  So what should you do?

 

The first thing you should consider is to go to flat rate pricing if you are not on it already.  This allows you to be upfront with consumers about what things will cost without going into mumbo-jumbo.  It also allows you the opportunity to properly price your payable hours as billable hours.  Secondly, you have an advantage over a retailer who is selling widgets over the Internet.  You have an applied product, not something that is plug-and-play.  The Internet can’t (at least yet) replace your technical skills and your ability to diagnose all of the thermal characteristics that have impact on a consumers energy consumption and comfort.  With that in mind, you can create a complete menu of flat rate priced services for the consumer who wants you to install equipment purchased on the Internet.  For example, you can have a fee for examining the structure to make sure it is properly matched to the purchased equipment.  The examination of the home required for that transaction allows you to examine the condition of the thermal envelope, ductwork and commensurate leakage.  It also allows you to investigate the presence of other items of potential interest to the consumer, such as areas of insufficient comfort, smart thermostats and IAQ options.

 

The point is, you can either treat Internet buyers and inquiries as hostile to your business or as leads for your business.  As the ACHR news article says, “What is your strategy?”


Are You Going to Get Your Fair Share?

We have heard the term “fair share” a lot in recent years, most of it has to do with if you are paying it.  Unless you have been living under a rock however, you know these are good times for the economy.  How good?  Consider these statistics.

 

According To the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University, homeowner expenditures on improvements and repairs will rise 7.5% in 2018 to approach $340 billion.  According to Freddie Mac, 3 trends will drive the mortgage market in 2018.  They expect increases in new home mortgages, they expect a cooling of refinancing to lower interest rates, and they expect an increase in homeowners tapping home-equity for home improvements.  Existing home sales are unlikely to increase due to limited inventory, so there is an expectation in longer-term treads toward aging in place – all of which point to an increase in expenditures for home improvements.  Of course, those home improvements include many things other than HVAC, but according to Appliance Design magazine, shipments of central air conditioners in the United States increased 6% in 2017 and are expected to increase another 5.4% in 2018.  The shipment of forced air furnaces are expected to increase 4.7%.  You get the point, things are booming.

Are You Going to Get Your Fair Share?

How is your company positioned to take advantage of these trends?  Do you have a business plan that you are working in order to achieve purposeful, sustained growth, or are you one of those firms that will experience “accidental growth”?  What is accidental growth?  That is the type of growth you experience because of the swell of market demand – and the type that disappears when the inevitable pendulum of the business cycle swings the other way.  If you are a medium to large sized firm, you are operating by plan, and not by accident.  But according to SICcode.com, there are 141,922 total companies in SIC code 1711, and these companies employ a total of 1,435,932 people.  What is SIC code 1711?  A Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) is a four digit numerical code assigned by the US government to business establishments to identify the primary business of the establishment.  SIC 1711 is the code assigned to special trade contractors primarily engaged in plumbing, heating, air-conditioning and similar work like sheet metal.  According to these numbers then, the average size of a company in SIC 1711 is 10 people.  While there is a significant deviation to this average, this effectively means there are a lot of small contractors in the heating and air-conditioning industry, and amongst this group are a lot of firms poised for “accidental growth”.  If you are one of those companies and accidental growth is okay with you, read no further.  If you are one of those companies however that desire purposeful, sustained growth, how do you go about achieving it?  In essence, the answer is to develop a sound business plan.

 

The term business plan is an anathema to many small firms, but such a plan need not be long or complex.  It needs to be what is effective and usable for your firm.  While this topic merits a discussion by itself, the key elements of a business plan include:

  • Strategic Discussion ~in other words, what kind of business do you want to develop into and what are your strengths and weaknesses relative to that strategy?
  • Market Analysis ~in other words, what are the opportunities in your locale and where do they exist?
  • Sales & Marketing Goals ~what are your top line revenue, gross margin and net profit goals, by major department? (I.e. new construction, replacement, service etc.) How many leads are you going to need to reach these goals, what are your closing ratios on these leads and what kinds of marketing/advertising will be required to generate these leads?
  • Production/Organization ~what is your current staffing by department, and what will be required in order to achieve your sales goals? What is the productivity of your service department (billable versus paid hours) and what are your strategies to meet commensurate goals?
  • Financial Requirements ~what is your current cash flow position and how will you fund future growth?

 

The above isn’t intended to be a template for a business plan, rather it provides a discussion framework for the major elements that need to be included in such a plan.  There are many places you can go to get help building a business plan.  There are online forums and tools for this purpose, you can tap into the expertise of other company owners you know or meet through associations such as the Air Conditioning Contractors of America, you can talk with the manufacturer whose products you represent and/or their distributors – there is literally a wealth of information out there for you to take advantage of.  If you want to grow your business however and you have not put together some type of business plan, now is the time – because time is a wastin!

 

 

 


The Other Side of the ASHRAE Show

When one thinks of the annual AHR Expo, a.k.a. ASHRAE Show, one thinks of the giant product exposition that showcases thousands of exhibitors showcasing new products, technologies and ideas.  All of that certainly is true, and this year’s Expo is no exception.  The ASHRAE Show this year will be at McCormick Place in Chicago, from January 22-24.  If you have never been to McCormick Place and are planning to attend this year’s event, bring your most comfortable pair of walking shoes!  McCormick Place is the nation’s largest convention center with over 2,600,000 ft.² of exhibit space.  Fortunately for your tired feet however, the AHR exhibition will only consume 500,000 ft.² of that.

 

The Product Expo – ½ Of the Show

The Product Expo – ½ Of the Show

What many contractors may not realize however is that the product Expo, massive as it is, is not the only reason to attend the ASHRAE Show.  There are a lot of educational opportunities at the show which one should not miss.  These educational opportunities are not just for engineers, there are many seminars of interest for contractors as well.  In all, there are 201 separate seminars being offered at this year’s show, and they typically fall into one of four categories.  These include, New Product and Technology Theater seminars, Free Seminars, ASHRAE Learning Institute Courses and Certifications & Other Exams.  Each of these segments is examined briefly below.

 

New Product & Technology Theater

Learning Opportunities – The Other Side

Learning Opportunities – The Other Side

No advance registration is necessary for these sessions, all of which are held in either Theater A,B or C.  These are not just for commercial contractors either, these are presentations by exhibitors at the show, each lasting approximately 20 minutes.  Diverse topics range from Dramatically Improved Flaring of Copper and Aluminum Tubing to Motor Solutions for Low-Speed Direct Drive HVAC Systems to The Latest Innovation in Home/Building Thermostats and much, much more.

 

Free Seminars

There are more than 50 free seminars on a range of topics, conducted by top industry experts lasting from 1 to 2 hours.  Again, the seminars are wide ranging and include diverse topics such as Solve Your Tech and Marketing Problems with One Metric to Global Trends in HVAC to Solve Hidden Maintenance Issues Using Testing and Balancing and much more.  Advance registration is not required for these courses.

 

ASHRAE Learning Institute Courses

The Institute will offer continuing education courses at the convention center, and these do require advance registration and payment.  Each full day course will earn attendees 6 Professional Development Hours/Learning Units, or 0.6 CEU’s, and half-day courses earn 3 professional development hours.  Topics include The Fundamentals of the Commissioning Process, Complying with Requirements of  ASHRAE Standards, Laboratory Design Basics And Beyond, Optimizing Indoor Environments and more.

 

Certifications & Other Exams

The following review sessions and exams will be available at the 2018 show.  These also require advance registration and payment.

  • NAFA Certified Air Filter Specialist testing & two hour tutorial
  • AABC Commissioning Group workshop and exam
  • HVAC review and NATE testing
  • Various ASHRAE certification exams

 

If you are going to the show, Do Not miss these terrific educational opportunities.  With a little advance planning, you can multiply tenfold the value of attending the exposition.  Please see this link for the full schedule of educational opportunities for each day of the show.


 


Christmas Marketing Tips for Your Business

Chances are that business is a little slower for you in December than at other timesof the year.  People typically focus their buying attention and dollars on Christmas gifts and holiday shopping, and not towards their HVAC and plumbing needs – except for emergencies, of course.  Therefore, your office staff is probably not quite as busy as they normally are, and the phones are not ringing as vibrantly as they usually do.  Similarly, you are likely to have some unbillable time on the part of your service technicians this month.  So how do you turn this investment of payroll into an advantage for your business?  There are lots of ways, this article is simply meant to start getting you thinking about what makes sense for your business.

 

Office Staff

  1. Launch a 12 Days of Christmas email marketing campaign to your customers. Gather your staff and brainstorm what this list might consist of, it doesn’t have to all be about your business.  You could offer specials on things like furnace filters or humidifier pads, even demand service or installation of accessories such as Wi-Fi thermostats.  You could also simply warm your customers hearts with the “best of” recipes for holiday treats from your staff.  The sky is the limit for ideas.
  2. Coordinate a Christmas theme on everything from your website to your social media to your blogs to mobile apps to your on hold messaging.
  3. Market things you are doing with your service technicians to your customer base. Send press releases to local news or trade publications regarding gratis services that your company is providing.
  4. Have your service staff decorate the office in a holiday theme.
  5. Tie your office staff into any charity related events that you are doing with your service technicians in #3 below.

 

Christmas Marketing Tips for Your Business

Image courtesy of Pinterest

Service Technicians

  1. Think of a product offering that is holiday themed. Think of the drinks offered by Starbucks only at this time of year – Peppermint Mocha etc.  If you are primarily in an air conditioning market that sometimes still needs heating, (i.e. North Texas) perhaps advertise a “shockingly good offer.”  No one in North Texas thinks about having a humidifier, yet at this time of year homes drop to unacceptable humidity levels.  Perhaps give the humidifier away for free if people will pay the labor to install.  Wrap it around a holiday theme such as, “Yule Not Be Shocked at How Comfortable This Can Make You.”.
  2. Offer incentives to your technicians if they sell items as part of the “12 Days of Christmas” promotion, while they are already on a paid service call.
  3. Offer holiday services, such as installing and taking down holiday lights for your customers.
  4. You could allow your technicians to participate in programs to help those in need, utilizing unbillable time.
  5. Make your technicians available to run service calls for elderly or low income homeowners at a reduced cost or free basis.

 

All Employees

  1. Don’t forget to show your employees your appreciation for all their hard work at Christmas as well. This can be done in innumerable ways, but if you don’t do something – you may well become the Grinch!

For Small Firms, A Cybersecurity Plan Need Not Be Complex to Be Effective

Cybersecurity

Image Courtesy of Bay Area Council

Staying current with events going on in your industry is crucial if you want to keep your business on the front line of progress.  You wouldn’t think of walling yourself off from news about your community, our country or the world.  Similarly, you should stay abreast about news events, product development, business development and more within your industry.

 

A couple of years ago there was an article in Contracting Business Magazine by Dominic Guarino about the need to have a cybersecurity plan for your business.  If you run a medium to large size business, you almost certainly do.  But what if you run a small business, a “mom-and-pop shop?”  You may not.  If so, this article represents a good place for you to start in developing a plan for your business.

 

The article cites research by the National Cyber Security Alliance which says that two thirds of small businesses say they are dependent on the Internet for day-to-day operations.  The research indicates that 69% of such businesses handle sensitive information, including customer data, while 49% have financial records and reports.  The research also indicates that 77% of small business respondents to their surveys do not have a formal written Internet security policy for employees.  What would you do if your information was lost or hacked?  How would that affect your company and its operations?  The article suggests that there are seven key areas to address in such a plan.  They are listed below.

 

  1. The type of data you collect, as well as where and how you store it. This includes customer data, company business and financial data, and personal employee data.
  2. Who has access to your data, your company network, Wi-Fi as well as protections you have in place.
  3. Employee password protection and use of company computers and devices. You should also address social media policy.
  4. Cataloging company hardware including computers, smart devices, external hard drives and backup media. You should also have a policy to address the proper disposal of such devices.
  5. Protecting company computers with antivirus and malware protection software, along with physical security of critical computers and servers.
  6. Protection of your data on the Internet, including your website, online databases, information stored in the cloud and credit card processors.
  7. A response plan in the event of theft or loss of data as well as the catastrophic failure of your company’s computer systems or network.

 

This is an excellent article in giving you an actionable starting point for addressing this critical aspect of your business.  If you would like more or more in depth information, you might check out the Cybersecurity Planning Guide published by the FCC.  You can find this article at the link below.

https://transition.fcc.gov/cyber/cyberplanner.pdf