Did You Fail the Interview?


Did you fail the interview?

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Remember, you are not the only one who is conducting the interview. According to LinkedIn Business Solutions, 65% of candidates say a bad interview experience make them lose interest in the job.

Interviewing is one of those subjects that everyone has an opinion about, because anyone who has ever worked (which includes just about everyone) has been through one.  Most of us have been through more than one interview in our lives, which likely means we have experienced both good and bad interviews.  This refers to the quality of the interview, not to our performance in them.  Unfortunately, it seems like attention paid to the interviewing process is lacking by many of those conducting them.  For one, the interviewing process is all too often handled in too casual of a manner, and is not approached from a planned or analytical point of view.  For example, if the person conducting an interview is the one who happens to be available at that moment in time, consider your firm guilty of failing the interview!  Other cardinal sins of interviewing include the interviewer talking too much, winging it when it comes to asking questions, not writing down and keeping a record of the candidate’s responses and not being clear it when it comes to articulating next steps with the candidate.  So what should you be trying to accomplish in interview and what are some steps you should take to make sure that is accomplished?

The objective of the interview should be formally defined by the interviewer in advance, and stated to the interviewee at the beginning of the discussion.  For example, you might tell the interviewee that the objective of the interview today is to better ascertain the candidates skills and fit for the opening available, and to allow the interviewee to find out more about both the company and the position so they can better decide whether it is a good fit for them.  If this is only an initial interview, make sure that is clear at the outset.  All persons from the company who plan on interviewing the same candidate should briefly meet before hand to discuss their strategy.  There is nothing to be gained by having multiple people ask the candidate the same or similar questions.  For example, one person might drill down on the candidates education and experience, while another might probe how they have or would handle real or theoretical situations.  The point is to find out information that you cannot discern from looking at their resume.  Following that, the interviewer should keep the following in mind as the discussion progresses.

  1. Allow sufficient time for the interview. If you rush the interview because you have too many other things going on, that will send major negative vibes to the candidate.  Remember, you are not only taking time out of your day for this process, but also time that the candidate could be productively looking for a job elsewhere.  If you are not prepared to spend a sufficient amount of time on the interview, reschedule or don’t hold the interview at all.
  2. Your job is to learn more about the candidate, not to tell them all about the position and how great the company is. Generally speaking, the interviewer should talk 20% of the time and listen 80% of the time.
  3. Give serious thought to your questions before hand and have them written down. You should be asking open ended questions that will elicit conversation, not those that lend themselves to yes/no or pat answers.  Having the questions written down keeps you from straying too far off course, and it communicates that you take both the candidate and the process seriously.  On the other hand, you want to be flexible enough to pursue a line of questioning if it is merited.  If you ask a question that elicits concern or further questions in your mind, spend time following your concern until you are satisfied. Jot notes down regarding the candidates responses to them, because a week later you are not likely to remember key elements of the candidates answers.  In addition, these notes will be extremely important if they are needed for reference prior to/during a subsequent interview.
  4. Remember that you communicate not only with what you say, but with how you say it. Your inflection, eye contact and body language are sending messages to the candidate.  By the same token, be looking for both verbal and nonverbal clues from the candidate in terms of their reaction to certain questions or elements of the discussion.
  5. Following the interview, all persons from the company who spoke with the candidate should briefly get together to compare notes. If you are the hiring manager, you may hear something from one of the other interviewers that causes you to disqualify the candidate, even if you had not arrived at that conclusion from your particular line of questioning.

 

While much, much more could be (and has been) written about this topic, these tips can go a long way toward making your interviews significantly more productive – both for you and for the candidate.