General


Did You Fail the Interview?

Did you fail the interview?

Image courtesy of wiki how

Remember, you are not the only one who is conducting the interview. According to LinkedIn Business Solutions, 65% of candidates say a bad interview experience make them lose interest in the job.

Interviewing is one of those subjects that everyone has an opinion about, because anyone who has ever worked (which includes just about everyone) has been through one.  Most of us have been through more than one interview in our lives, which likely means we have experienced both good and bad interviews.  This refers to the quality of the interview, not to our performance in them.  Unfortunately, it seems like attention paid to the interviewing process is lacking by many of those conducting them.  For one, the interviewing process is all too often handled in too casual of a manner, and is not approached from a planned or analytical point of view.  For example, if the person conducting an interview is the one who happens to be available at that moment in time, consider your firm guilty of failing the interview!  Other cardinal sins of interviewing include the interviewer talking too much, winging it when it comes to asking questions, not writing down and keeping a record of the candidate’s responses and not being clear it when it comes to articulating next steps with the candidate.  So what should you be trying to accomplish in interview and what are some steps you should take to make sure that is accomplished?

The objective of the interview should be formally defined by the interviewer in advance, and stated to the interviewee at the beginning of the discussion.  For example, you might tell the interviewee that the objective of the interview today is to better ascertain the candidates skills and fit for the opening available, and to allow the interviewee to find out more about both the company and the position so they can better decide whether it is a good fit for them.  If this is only an initial interview, make sure that is clear at the outset.  All persons from the company who plan on interviewing the same candidate should briefly meet before hand to discuss their strategy.  There is nothing to be gained by having multiple people ask the candidate the same or similar questions.  For example, one person might drill down on the candidates education and experience, while another might probe how they have or would handle real or theoretical situations.  The point is to find out information that you cannot discern from looking at their resume.  Following that, the interviewer should keep the following in mind as the discussion progresses.

  1. Allow sufficient time for the interview. If you rush the interview because you have too many other things going on, that will send major negative vibes to the candidate.  Remember, you are not only taking time out of your day for this process, but also time that the candidate could be productively looking for a job elsewhere.  If you are not prepared to spend a sufficient amount of time on the interview, reschedule or don’t hold the interview at all.
  2. Your job is to learn more about the candidate, not to tell them all about the position and how great the company is. Generally speaking, the interviewer should talk 20% of the time and listen 80% of the time.
  3. Give serious thought to your questions before hand and have them written down. You should be asking open ended questions that will elicit conversation, not those that lend themselves to yes/no or pat answers.  Having the questions written down keeps you from straying too far off course, and it communicates that you take both the candidate and the process seriously.  On the other hand, you want to be flexible enough to pursue a line of questioning if it is merited.  If you ask a question that elicits concern or further questions in your mind, spend time following your concern until you are satisfied. Jot notes down regarding the candidates responses to them, because a week later you are not likely to remember key elements of the candidates answers.  In addition, these notes will be extremely important if they are needed for reference prior to/during a subsequent interview.
  4. Remember that you communicate not only with what you say, but with how you say it. Your inflection, eye contact and body language are sending messages to the candidate.  By the same token, be looking for both verbal and nonverbal clues from the candidate in terms of their reaction to certain questions or elements of the discussion.
  5. Following the interview, all persons from the company who spoke with the candidate should briefly get together to compare notes. If you are the hiring manager, you may hear something from one of the other interviewers that causes you to disqualify the candidate, even if you had not arrived at that conclusion from your particular line of questioning.

 

While much, much more could be (and has been) written about this topic, these tips can go a long way toward making your interviews significantly more productive – both for you and for the candidate.


Are You a Micromanager?

Are you a micromanager?

Image courtesy of Pinterest

The term micromanager is one that is perceived negatively by managers – as it should be!  The behaviors associated with being a micromanager include detailed inquiries into the activities of both the employee and projects they are engaged in.  Micromanagers not only want to control the outcome of their employees projects, they also want to direct the process of how those outcomes are achieved.  These managers feel it is their job to give detailed directions to their employee in order to maintain control of the project.  If you were to ask the manager how they felt about the way they interacted with their employees, they might admit to wanting to maintain control, but it is doubtful they would classify themselves as micromanagers.

 

Their employees however would offer a different perspective.  They would likely describe themselves as frustrated and their work environment as constrained.  Micromanagement can reduce an employee’s productivity because it inhibits their creativity and erodes their confidence in solving problems.  Over time, this can cause the relationship between the employee and their manager to become strained and can result in low morale and high turnover.  Micromanagement typically drives away the good people, leaving in place the less capable.

 

Why does a manager micromanage?  Typically, these managers fear losing control, and the only way they know how to maintain it is to involve themselves in every aspect of their employees activity.  They might fear losing control because they are a new manager, and don’t know how else to practice their managerial duties. An all too often scenario is that an individual who is highly skilled and has a great deal of expertise is promoted into management.  Now they find themselves in a situation where they have responsibility over individuals they see as being much less skilled, so they feel the need to exert control in order to achieve outcomes that look like the ones they have produced in the past.  Perhaps you are an entrepreneur who went into business for yourself in order to be your own boss.  Now your business has grown, and you have people working for you who have high levels of competence.  This might make you feel diminished or out of control, so you react by involving yourself deeper into the daily activities of your employees.  This likely will result in outcomes you don’t expect and don’t want.

 

Employees who are being micromanaged will likely react one of two ways.  On the one hand, they may develop a total dependence on the manager because they don’t feel like they can make a decision on their own.  That reduces productivity because employees feel that the best way to accomplish what the boss is asking for is to run everything by them before taking action on anything.  If the boss is busy, which is typically the case, waiting on decisions extends the timeline of the project.  It may also lead the employee to stop caring, which causes their talent to be underutilized because it is no longer offered.  On the other hand, employees who pride themselves on their own capabilities and expertise will feel building frustration and resentment toward the manager.  This resentment can lead toward conflict with the manager, and the resulting frustration can cause the employee to leave the organization.  If the employee was truly talented, their loss should be chalked up to poor management.  The best thing an employee can do with a micromanaging supervisor is to give them all the information they need.  Knowing their boss thrives on details, they should provide them with detailed reports.  They should also ask clarifying questions in order to make sure they know what their bosses are looking for, and repeat the answers they are given to make sure they have heard correctly.  For managers, the most important realization they can come to is that micromanagement does not offer any benefit as far as workplace productivity and employee development are concerned.  Managers need to be clear about what needs to be accomplished and by when, then give general directions as far as how the end result should be accomplished.  They should make it clear to their employees that if they want direction they should not be afraid to ask for it.  If the employee then does ask for guidance, they should not be berated for doing so.  By letting your employees make decisions about how they accomplish outcomes related to their responsibilities, you will be helping them learn how to become managers in their own right while freeing yourself for higher-level activities.


A Crisis of Trust

Source: supportforstepdads.com

The Annual Edelman Trust Barometer shows an overall reduction of trust in the four institutions it measures; the government, media, business and nongovernmental institutions.  In addition, the credibility of  “a person like yourself” – often a source of news and information on social media, has dipped to an all-time low in the studies history.  The survey shows trust falling more steeply in the United States than in any of the 28 countries surveyed, despite the robust economy and booming stock market.  The survey also showed that Americans’ trust in their own companies fell more steeply than in any other country.  Richard Edelman, head of the communications marketing firm that commissioned the research, said “The United States is enduring an unprecedented crisis of trust.”  Why is that, and could it be happening in your business?

 

The survey sites a number of reasons for this discord.  The past year has been one of exceptional public opinion volatility, and concerns about issues ranging from stagnant wage growth to mass shootings along with a number of others are juxtaposed against the buoyancy of a strong economy.  According to the survey, the result is an unsettled and unnerved public at large.  Particularly for business leaders, the survey suggests that this is not the time for inaction or staying silent.  Getting employees and customers to trust you can be complicated, but it is imperative to your success.  If lost, it may be impossible to recover.

 

According to Chelsea Berler of the Entrepreneurial Network, the following seven concrete actions build trust in a business environment.

  1. Demonstrate That You Trust Others. One way to do this is to be generous and forgiving when someone else makes a mistake or disappoints you in some way.
  2. Create Relationships That Are Mutually Beneficial. Customers and employees all want to believe they are making the right decision to work with you, and trust is about showing people you care about them.
  3. Directly Address Issues. How you deal with concerns and problems is what instills trust and loyalty.
  4. Tell the Truth. If you get caught in a lie, no one will trust you.
  5. Be Flexible and Patient. Trust is built over time, especially when you are dealing with someone who isn’t fortunate enough to have experienced trust in their own life.
  6. Respect Others Time. To earn others trust, raise your awareness of their time, personal schedule and needs.
  7. Deliver the Unexpected. The best way to deliver trust is to delight clients and customers.

 

Click Here, For more information on this topic from this article.

 

Sources: The Edelman Trust Barometer; Chelsea Berler, Entrepreneurial Network


Thanksgiving

cr-td16This week we will celebrate the beginning of the holiday season with a traditional American holiday, Thanksgiving.  For some, it will be a joyous time of getting together to celebrate family, food and football.  For others however, it will be a time to once again remember how much you don’t have in common with your in-laws.  After the recent contentious election, the opportunity for discord will only be magnified by getting together with relatives.  Perhaps lost in all the hustle and bustle is the reason we celebrate Thanksgiving in the first place.

 

Three hundred and ninety-six years ago a small ship carrying 102 passengers left Plymouth, England in September for the New World, lured by the promise of prosperity and land ownership.  They were also seeking a place where they could freely practice their faith.  Following a difficult 66 day journey, passengers of the Mayflower dropped anchor far north of their intended destination.  One month later, they crossed Massachusetts Bay and established a village at Plymouth.  During that first brutal winter, most of the colonists remained on board the ship, where they suffered from exposure and outbreaks of disease.  Only half of the original passengers and crew lived to see spring.  The following March, the remaining settlers moved to shore, thereby starting a wave of immigration that continues to this day.  Far from being shunned by the natives, the settlers received an astonishing visit from an Indian who greeted them in English.  Several days later, he returned with another Native American named Squanto, who was a member of the Pawtuxet tribe.  Squanto had been kidnapped by an English sea captain and sold into slavery before escaping to London and returning to his homeland.  Squanto taught the pilgrims, weakened by malnutrition and illness, how to cultivate corn, extract sap from maple trees, catch fish in the rivers and avoid poisonous plants.  He also helped the settlers forge an alliance with a local Indian tribe, one which would endure for more than 50 years.  In November 1621 after the pilgrims first harvest proved successful, Gov. William Bradford organized a celebratory feast and invited a group of native American allies to join them in giving thanks.  This is now remembered as America’s “first Thanksgiving.”

 

The trend by retailers to get you thinking about Christmas giftgiving is not a recent one either.  Abraham Lincoln established Thanksgiving is a national holiday in 1863, designating the final Thursday in November for its celebration.  Franklin Roosevelt moved the holiday up a week in 1939 however in an attempt to spur retail sales during the Great Depression.  Opponents referred to his plan as “Franksgiving”, and Roosevelt reluctantly had to move the holiday back to the fourth Thursday in November in 1941.

 

So if you are already dreading the journey over the river and through the woods, remember to think about why we celebrate Thanksgiving in the first place and remember the blessing that is your family, your career and this country.  Now, if you could please pass the turkey!

Happy Thanksgiving from Callahan Roach!


The Case for Disability Insurance: Part 2

A major disability is something that happens to someone else… until it doesn’t!  The sad fact is most Americans are better prepared to die than they are to deal with disabilities.  In the last blog, we made the case for having disability insurance.  In this blog, we will make the case for affording disability insurance.

 

 

The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that as of April, 2016 there are about 122.74 million people working on a full-time basis.  According to the chart below, only about 37% of private sector employees are covered by long-term disability insurance.  This would suggest that only about 45 million full-time workers are covered by long-term disability.

 

 

According to Kaiser Health News, only 47% of employers offer long-term disability coverage to their employees, and companies with at least 100 employees are almost certain to offer some sort of disability benefit.  Furthermore, they report that the majority of people with disability coverage get it through their jobs.  The chart below offers a glimpse of disability insurance coverage by occupation group.

 

Access to disability benefit combinations, by occupation group, private industry workers, March 2014
Occupation group Percent with access to both short- and long-term disability insurance Percent with access to only short-term disability insurance Percent with access to only long-term disability insurance Percent with no access to insurance
All workers 25 15 9 51
Management, professional, and related 42 12 17 29
Service 6 14 4 76
Sales and office 25 13 9 53
Natural resources, construction, and maintenance 21 18 6 55
Production, transportation, and material moving 25 22 7 47
Note: Costs calculated from Employer Cost for Employee Compensation (ECEC) published estimates.

Source: National Compensation Survey, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.


The cost of providing both short- and long-term disability insurance access to all private sector workers would be approximately 1.0 percent of total compensation. This would cost an employer $624 each year for a full-time (2,080 hour) worker, as illustrated below.


Estimated cost of access to short- and long-term disability insurance, by occupation group, private industry workers, March 2014
Occupation group Short-term disability insurance Long-term disability insurance
Percent with Access Benefit cost per hour worked Employer access cost per hour worked Percent with Access Benefit cost per hour worked Employer access cost per hour worked
All workers 40 $0.06 $0.15 34 $0.05 $0.15
Management, professional, and related 54 $0.10 $0.19 59 $0.09 $0.15
Service 20 10
Sales and office 38 $0.04 $0.11 34 $0.03 $0.09
Natural resources, construction, and maintenance 40 $0.09 $0.23 27 $0.03 $0.11
Production, transportation, and material moving 47 $0.06 $0.13 31 $0.06 $0.19
As seen in table 6, the cost of access for short-term disability and long-term disability across all private industry workers is $0.30 per hour worked ($0.15 each). The estimate ranges from $0.11 for sales and office workers to $0.23 for natural resources, construction, and maintenance workers. There are no reliable estimates for service workers, which is not surprising given that few service workers have access to employer-provided disability insurance. As a whole, however, the cost of providing both short- and long-term disability insurance access to all private sector workers would be approximately 1.0 percent of total compensation cost ($0.30/$29.99). This would cost an employer $624 each year for a full-time (2,080 hour) worker.

Note: Costs calculated from Employer Cost for Employee Compensation (ECEC) published estimates. Dash indicates data not available or applicable.

Source: National Compensation Survey, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.


Of employers that offer disability coverage 37% paid the entire premium in 2010, down from 49% in 2002.  As of 2011, voluntary programs (meaning the employee pays the full cost) make up 50% of all long-term disability offerings, up from 41% in 2002.  According to the Council for disability awareness, however, when employers add disability insurance as a voluntary benefit, participation is only around 40%.

 

Sources

Forbes

Counsel for Disability Awareness

US Bureau of Labor Statistics

Kaiser Health News


The Case for Disability Insurance

A major disability is something that happens to someone else… until it doesn’t!  The sad fact is most Americans are better prepared to die than they are to deal with disabilities.  If you are in your twenties, the chances are you rarely think about this.  But you should.  Just over one in 4 of today’s 20-year-olds will become disabled before they retire.In fact, over 37 million Americans or about 12% of the total population are classified as disabledMore than 50% of those disabled Americans are between the ages of 18-64.  At the end of 2012, 8.8 million wage earners representing more than 5% of the entire workforce were receiving Social Security disability insurance, (SSDI) 2.5 million of these were in their twenties, thirties or forties.  But I’m careful, I eat healthy and work out you say.  As it turns out, accidents are NOT usually the culprit.  Statistically, about 90% of disabilities are caused by illness.  Cancer, heart disease and other illnesses cause the majority of long-term absences.  Consider the following statistic for a 35-year-old male.

These costs are immediate, expensive and often not covered by insurance!

These costs are immediate, expensive and often not covered by insurance!

A non-smoking male, 5’10”, 170 pounds, who works an office job with some outdoor physical responsibilities and who leads a healthy lifestyle has the following risks:

  • A 21% chance of becoming disabled for 3 months or longer during his working career
    • Of these, 38% run the chance that the disability will last 5 years or longer
    • the average disability length for this person is 82 months

 

Similarly, a 35-year-old female weighing 125 pounds has a 24% chance of becoming disabled for 3 months or more during her working career.  As you can see, the chances are simply too great to ignore for the average working person.  Furthermore, most people think that Workers Comp or Social Security Disability insurance will cover their needs if they become disabled.  According to the Council for Disability Awareness, less than 5% of disabling accidents and illnesses are work-related.  The other 95% are not, meaning Workers Compensation does not cover them.  In addition, according to the Social Security Administration, 65% of initial SSDI claim applications were denied in 2012.  The average SSDI monthly benefit payment for males was $1256 and for females was $993, with 93% of all recipients receiving less than $2000 per month.

 

Given these numbers, how well prepared are American workers for disability?  Not very.  Forty-eight percent of US families do not save any of their annual income, and one third of working families have no retirement savings.  Consider the following chilling statistics.

  • 68% of adult Americans have no savings earmarked for emergencies
  • 65% of working Americans say they could not cover normal living expenses even for one year if their employment income was lost.
  • 38% could not pay their bills for more than 3 months.

So what does the average family do when confronted with a disability?  They begin running up expenses on their credit cards, get a 2nd mortgage, cash in their 401(k) or take out a home equity line of credit and ask family and friends for assistance through sites like go fund me.  As you might guess from the above numbers however, these solutions are inadequate.  According to a Harvard study, 62% of all personal bankruptcies and over 50% of mortgage foreclosures are a consequence of disability, and many end up on Medicaid for insurance.  Keep in mind that while Medicaid rules vary from state to state, the general requirements for income are less than $931 per month and countable assets of $2000 per person, not including your primary residence (with limitations based on your home equity), personal property and household belongings and up to one motor vehicle.  ($3000 per couple living in the same household)

 

What is the answer then?  Disability insurance!  How common is it?  Consider:

  • 65-70 % of workers in the private sector have no long-term disability insurance
  • That equates to about 75-80 million private-sector workers who are without long-term disability income insurance
  • Worse yet, only 46% of workers have even discussed disability planning

 

Next Blog: Access To And Cost of Disability Insurance

 

Sources

American Journal of Medicine

US Social Security Administration

Counsel for Disability Awareness

US Federal Reserve Board

American Payroll Association

Get Sick, Get out: The Medical Causes of Home Mortgage Foreclosures


Memorial Day

Memorial DayOh that first long weekend of the year!  Memorial Day marks the unofficial start of summer, and it’s mere mention conjurers up thoughts of picnics, parades, grilling out and adventure travel.  Pretty much everyone knows that Memorial Day commemorates those who have given their lives in service to their country.  But do you know the history of Memorial Day?

 

The practice of honoring those who have fallen in battle actually dates back thousands of years.  The ancient Greeks and Romans held annual days of remembrance for loved ones killed in battle, festooning their graves with flowers and holding public festivals and feasts in their honor.  One of the first known public tributes to war dead was in 431 BC, when the Athenian general and statesman Pericles delivered a funeral oration praising the sacrifice and valor of those killed in the Peloponnesian war.  (An ancient Greek war fought by Athens against the Peloponnesian league led by Sparta)

 

In this country, Decoration Day as it was originally known, dates back about 150 years.  In 1868, Gen. John Logan issued a decree that May 30 should become a nationwide day of commemoration for the more than 620,000 soldiers killed in the Civil War.  According to legend, Logan chose May 30 because it was a rare day that didn’t fall on the anniversary of a Civil War battle.  Logan Circle in Washington, DC is named in honor of this general.  By 1890, every former state of the union had adopted it as an official holiday.  But for more than 50 years, the holiday was used to commemorate just those killed in the Civil War.  It wasn’t until World War I that the tradition was expanded to include those killed in all wars, even though Memorial Day did not become a federal holiday until 1971.

 

The term Decoration Day was used for more than a century until it was changed to Memorial Day by federal law.  In 1968 Congress moved Memorial Day from May 30 to the last Monday in May.  Did you know that Memorial Day has a “birthplace”?  In 1966 President Johnson signed legislation declaring Waterloo, New York as the official birthplace of Memorial Day.  In 2000, Congress passed legislation encouraging all Americans to pause for a national moment of remembrance at 3 PM local time.  So this Memorial Day as you are enjoying all the festivities of the holiday weekend, take a moment to think about those who served and sacrificed to make it possible!

 

Source: The History Channel

 

I pray that our Heavenly Father may assuage the anguish of your bereavement, and leave you only the cherished memory of the loved and lost, and the solemn pride that must be yours to have laid so costly a sacrifice upon the altar of freedom.

Excerpt from letter written to Mrs. Bixby of Boston, Massachusetts by Abraham Lincoln on November 21, 1864, after two of her sons were killed in battle.

 


Flat Rate Pricing Is So Easy A Caveman Can Do It – by Mike Hajduk

Flat Rate Pricing Is So Easy A Caveman Can Do ItGive me 20 minutes and I’ll show you how to raise your margins by 20%.  Ever hear anything like this?  This is a variation on the popular commercials with the caveman who is miffed at the reference that cavemen are Neanderthals.  The insurance provider claims that if you invest 15 minutes, they can save you up to 15% on your auto policy. I’m not as conservative. Take 20 minutes to read on and I will show you how to increase your margins by almost 20%. And without your customers beating you up over your prices.

 

Ok, so you do all the things right. You hired service people with a good aptitude and attitude, gave them some training through your distributor and manufacturers, promoted your company in your community, added some new truck signage and then, alas, you get called by a customer for your services to do a remodel, start weekly maintenance or repair something that has broken.  But when all is said and done and you get your Income Statement, you found that you have lost money in service.  How can that be?

 

This scenario is not unusual, and has even prompted some influential and sizable companies in the pool business to minimize or even close their service departments. Some construction companies have even resorted to having a subcontractor friend who does service to “take over the account” once the pool is out of warranty.

 

What the contractor is really saying is that they do not know how to charge enough to make money in service. Since so many contractors charge LESS than breakeven, it’s no surprise that they want out of service. It’s not unusual for a service company to incur a breakeven per hour cost of $75 – 85 per hour or higher*. Why, oh why, do so many service companies charge less than that for service? Do you?

 

“We can’t charge any more, our customers are already complaining about our rates”.  Have you ever said this?

 

If your customers are complaining about a service rate that is BELOW your breakeven, it does make sense to want to shed that losing department and let someone else worry about the customer. “After all, the customer already gave me $48,000 for a new pool and I don’t need to lose any money on the customer”.  Sound logic. But not the best for your company in the long term.

 

So what is the answer?  Stay tuned for next week’s blog!

*See June, 2016 blog about calculating your breakeven point


The Vision of Freedom

The Vision of Freedom

Betsy Ross flag, picture courtesy of UShistory.org.

Last week, we celebrated the 240th anniversary of the birth of our country.  In a letter to his wife Abigail on July 3, 1776 John Adams said this about the vote for independence, which occurred the day before in Congress.  “I am apt to believe that it (vote for independence) will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary Festival.  It ought to be commemorated as the day of deliverance by solemn acts of devotion to God Almighty.  It ought to be solemnized with pomp and parade, with shews (shows), games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires and illuminations (fireworks) from one end of this continent to the other from this time forward forever more.”

 

I spent some time on July 4th thinking about how one could so accurately predict how this event would be celebrated in future generations.  After all, at the time of the adoption of this declaration, the state of our union was extremely fragile, and by later signing the declaration, these men had effectively signed their own death warrant.  Adams however was not on a euphoric high over the vote on July 2.  He further noted in his letter to Abigail, “you will think me transported with Enthusiasm but I am not – I am well aware of the toil and blood and treasure that it will cost us to maintain this declaration, and support and defend the states.  Yet through all the gloom I can see the rays of ravishing light and glory.  I can see that the end is more than worth all the means.  And that posterity will triumph in that day’s transaction even although we should rue (bitterly regret) it, which I trust in God we shall not.”

 

John Adams didn’t celebrate the Fourth of July because he believed it should be celebrated on July 2, the date which Congress voted on the motion for independence made by Richard Henry Lee.  (One of whose descendants included Robert E Lee, the Confederate General) In a twist of fate, John Adams died on July 4, 1826 – the same day as did Thomas Jefferson.

 

John Adams life and letter gives us all something to think about as we celebrate our nation’s independence!


If You Were Fired – Would You Be Missed?

If You Were Fired - Would You Be Missed?

Courtesy of blogging4jobs.com

A couple of years ago there was a great article in the ACHR News that asked the question, what makes an employee indispensable? One employee that I used to know said the secret was to be like a blade of grass – keep your head down so it doesn’t get chopped off. That strategy however would suggest that you blend in, fly under the radar, not stand out, fit in, in essence – be an average employee!

 

The article then referred to a post by Joe Crisara of ContractorSelling.com who posed the question that is the title of this blog. Joe suggests that rather than being invisible, you should strive to be indispensable. He further pointed out that being indispensable is a three-legged stool which includes the traits of being the go to expert, having customers who are your fans and bringing home the bacon. Joe went on to explain in his post that being good with customers is not enough if you have callbacks, and that being technically sound is not enough if you are not good with customers.

 

Being a good employee means that you have to put yourself in the mindset of your employer or supervisor. Do you know what their goals are and how they are being measured? If you don’t know, you should ask. Furthermore, look at those employees in the organization who are succeeding and who are getting the promotions. Observe their behaviors and see what it is that makes them successful. Often times, you will likely see that they are the people who tackle the tough jobs, not the easy ones. You will also likely find them to be among the first to lend a hand to a coworker who is having difficulty with something, and a common denominator of these individuals is that they have a positive attitude about both their job and the company. Finally, the successful individuals in any organization are not ones who look at their job as an 8-5 proposition. They are the ones who work to better themselves by becoming a knowledge expert, studying after hours in an effort to hone their expertise. When you’re amongst the 80/20 crowd, be the latter, not the former!