The Pete Rose Principle


The Pete Rose PrincipleFor those of you who do not know who Pete Rose is or who never saw him play, I am only sorry that you did not get a chance to watch this icon of American baseball in action.  Unfortunately, today he is best known for the accusations of gambling that led major league baseball to ban him from the sport in 1989.  Regardless however, when you watched Pete Rose play baseball, you knew you were watching someone who truly enjoyed the game.  If Rose drew a walk at the plate, he didn’t saunter to first – he ran.  His aggressive baserunning style included distinctive headfirst slides.  He played in the major leagues for 23 years, amassing 4256 hits, still a record in MLB.  His lifetime batting average was .303.  All this earned Pete Rose the nickname, “Charlie Hustle.”

 

That’s interesting, you say, but what does that have to do with anything?  It is relevant because The Pete Rose Principle is one we can learn from and apply to our work life, regardless of what that work is.  Success does not always go to the smartest, the most highly pedigreed, or the most polished.  History is full of such examples.  People like Harry Truman, Ulysses S Grant, Steve Jobs, Vincent van Gogh, the list is virtually endless.  Like Pete Rose, these individuals had flaws.  However, they also had an overarching passion for achievement, rising to the top of their chosen field of endeavor.

 

What are some of the lessons we can take away from these individuals to benefit our own lives?  I believe the following five items are key elements of The Pete Rose Principle.

  1. Lifelong learning. So, you graduated from technical school, college etc., now what?  That’s not the end of your learning, that’s just the beginning.  Technology is revolutionizing the world we live in, and that is certainly true of the HVAC industry.  Embrace the concept of continuous learning, lifelong  This will keep you moving along in your career when others have stalled, because they did not embrace this concept.
  2. Passion for what you’re doing ~loving it. During a game in the 1970s, Pete Rose was running in to the dugout at the end of an inning.  Astroturf was a new phenomena in baseball, and Pete was practicing his skill at dribbling a baseball all the way in to the infield.  Passion is something you feel, and something others can see.
  3. Willingness to work hard. This is one of the major traits that tends to cull the herd over time.  People who are willing to work hard go further than people who are not.  You cannot force people to work harder, and you can only incentivize them to do so for a short period of time.  Ultimately, people either want to work hard or they don’t, and it can be a main differentiator for success.
  4. Flexibility and adaptability. We live in a global society, and the pace of change is accelerating at an increasing rate.  What worked yesterday won’t necessarily work today.  Hierarchical organizational structures are giving way to collaborative work teams.  If you are not flexible and willing to adapt to change, you will most certainly be left behind.
  5. Persistence – don’t quit. “Colonel” Sanders submitted his fried chicken recipe to 1009 restaurants before finding a buyer.  Henry Ford was bankrupted, and left penniless five times before founding the Ford Motor Company.  Thomas Edison discovered over 1000 ways he could not build a lightbulb, before he found success.  After high school, Steven Spielberg was rejected from the University of Southern California’s School of Theater, Film and Television – not once, but three times!  After attending another university, he dropped out and pursued directing without a degree.  Persistence is an attitude, one that is born out of the first four characteristics listed above.

 

Your career may never land you in the Hall of Fame, but the Pete Rose Principle embodies traits that bode well for individuals throughout a lifetime.